Chanterelle Mushrooms

Chanterelles are a wild mushroom. While several varieties exist, the most commonly known one is golden chanterelle – a beautiful trumpet-shaped, almost flower-like mushroom, with false gills running down their stems. You can find them in orange, yellow, or white in color, depending on the species. Those bright colors help them to stand out for foragers. Chanterelle mushrooms are a delightful and unique ingredient to cook with.

Buy Chanterelle Mushrooms

Foraged Ethics

Encouraging sustainability and proper conduct for all members.

How to Cook Chanterelle Mushrooms

You can either incorporate them into a favorite dish, or lightly sautè and serve atop a tasty entree. Forager Chef describes chanterelles as having “an aroma as sweet as the ripest apricot you’ve ever smelled.” They are prized for their gorgeous color as much as their subtle, slightly fruity and peppery flavor, which makes them a great addition to many dishes. You might also showcase their peppery flavor by lightly cooking and serving atop crusty bread with ricotta and arugula. Foraged also has dried chanterelle strips for your to enjoy. Simply place the dried Chanterelles in a bowl of clean fresh water for about 30 minutes until reconstituted and enjoy as if they were fresh! 

Check out these Chanterelle recipes from the Foraged recipe library:

How to Find Chanterelles Near Me

Like morels, chanterelles like to grow where the earth has been disturbed and in hardwood forests. Chanterelles will be found near trees, as they have a symbiotic relationship with tree roots. They often grow by themselves rather than in large clusters, and will grow with separate stems. These mushrooms flourish with heavy rain and humidity. July to September tends to be the best time for chanterelles, but this varies by region.

Health Benefits of Chanterelles

Chanterelles are a plentiful source of vitamin D and potassium, as well as B vitamins, zinc, copper, and fiber. They have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and wound-healing properties based on this study from the National Center for Biotechnology Information and National Library of Medicine, a division of the National Institutes of Health, which showed significant wound-healing activity in groups of rats treated with chanterelle mushroom extract.

To learn more, read our blog "The Essential Guide to Chanterelle Mushrooms"

Vendor Support Form